Persistent snoring in young children has been linked to the
development of behavioural problems in later years, new research
has shown.


According to a study published in this month's edition of the
journal Pediatrics, children who
snored when aged two and three were almost 3.5 times more likely to
develop behavioural problems in later life than those kids who
slept quietly.


Author of the report Dean Beebe, director of the neuropsychology
programme at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, said
the results clearly highlighted the impact that snoring can have on
neurological development in young children, meaning the effort to
tackle the underlying issues of disrupted sleep for these kids
could have significant benefits.


Mr Beebe highlighted how snoring can impact on a young person's
ability to achieve deep, restful sleep, while conditions including
sleep apnoea can also starve the brain of oxygen - something that
can ultimately have a major impact on a child's development.


He stated: "We're talking about a brain that is constantly
remodelling through early childhood, with connections being
strengthened and weakened."


This means tackling persistent snoring in young children is
extremely important for their long-term wellbeing. Indeed, many
parents do not realise that snoring can be a major problem for
young children and therefore do not address the issue.


However, Mr Beebe noted there are treatments that can help and
this can reverse any ill effects of the condition in no time.


The news follows recent comments from sleep expert Sammy Margo,
who argued helping young people into a regular sleep routine can
have a significantly beneficial impact on their development, as
this ensures they are getting the right amount of sleep and are
developing habits that will serve them well throughout their
lives.


"Establishing - however painful it is - a bedtime routine for your
children [is important]. There are a whole host of people who are
up at two in the morning and you think you are all alone," she
concluded.


Posted by Elizabeth MewesADNFCR-1744-ID-801428476-ADNFCR