We've launched our very own interactive
map
 revealing the sleeping habits of the nation,
including Britain's 'sleepiest counties'.


Our research with The University of Leeds found 25
per cent of Brits only slept for five hours or less per night -
more than two hours less than the national recommended average of
seven and a half hours. 


We have created an online
search tool
 to highlight where in the UK the sleep
debt is most prominent, and which of the UK's counties fared best
and worst when it came to sleep satisfaction. 


Our results found that Leicestershire leads the way
as the nation's 'sleepiest county', with residents getting on
average over seven and a half hours of sleep per night, closely
followed by Worcestershire with an average of seven
hours. 


Top five sleepiest counties (achieving 7+ hours of
sleep per night)


1. Leicestershire

2. Worcestershire

3. Edinburgh

4. Northumberland

5. Norfolk 


The research has revealed how some areas of the
country are certainly faring better than others when it comes to
bedding down. 


Residents in Herefordshire and East Riding of
Yorkshire received less than five hours of sleep per
night! 


The research also found a sizeable discrepancy
between how much sleep Brits intend to have and how much we
actually get. While we recognise that between seven and eight hours
is what we need, we typically get nearly an hour less than
intended. 


Lecturer in Psychology Dr Anna Weigall, who led the
sleep research at University of Leeds, noted that the greatest
sleep disruption lies in the Home Counties, and areas where long
commutes are required. She argues commuter behaviour could be
responsible for the tug of war between intended and actual
sleep.


Our sleep expert, Dr Nerina
Ramlakhan believes there are many factors, including mental health,
diet and technology, which can result in Brits being unable to nod
off.


She said: "There are many factors
that can prevent us from being happy sleepers but there's plenty of
simple things we can try to help get a more enjoyable night's
sleep. 


"My top tips would be to manage your
work-life balance and set a time when you stop thinking and talking
about work, to go 'tech free' for at least 90 minutes before bed
time, and to make sure sugary snacks and heavy meals are avoided
before bed".


How does your bedtime compare? Find
out using Silentnight's interactive sleep map and get more tips
from sleep expert Dr Nerina on how to get a great night's sleep -www.silentnight.co.uk/sleep-matters/interactive-map/


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